House Majority Leader Responds to Fiscal Committee Approval of Medicaid Expansion Work Requirement Waiver Application

CONCORD- House Majority Leader Richard Hinch (R-Merrimack) released the following statement in response to the Joint Legislative Fiscal Committee approving the application for a waiver on the work requirement for those participating in the expanded Medicaid program. The committee approved the waiver application by a voice vote.

“This provision protects taxpayers and provides an incentive for childless, able-bodied citizens to participate in the workforce if they are to be enrolled in the program. Our state needs workers, and this creates a pathway between program participants and our business community looking to fill jobs in this growing economy,” said Hinch.

“The budget bill that included the work requirement language passed with a bipartisan vote. It is the position of this legislature and the law of the state that we submit this waiver application, and we believe this is a reasonable personal responsibility measure.”

Background: HB517 (2017) included a provision for a work requirement for any person participating in the expanded Medicaid program in New Hampshire, and gave authority to the governor and the Joint Legislative Fiscal Committee to approve the application. If the waiver is not approved, the program will not been reauthorized beyond December 31, 2018. The criteria for the requirement are as follows:

Newly eligible adults who are unemployed shall be eligible to receive benefits under RSA 126-A:5 XXIV-XXV, if the commissioner finds that the individual is engaging in at least 20 hours per week upon application of benefits, 25 hours per week after receiving 12 months of benefits over the lifetime of the applicant and 30 hours per week after receiving 24 months of benefits over the lifetime of the applicant of one or a combination of the following activities:
(A)  Unsubsidized employment.
(B)  Subsidized private sector employment.
(C)  Subsidized public sector employment.
(D)  Work experience, including work associated with the refurbishing of publicly assisted housing, if sufficient private sector employment is not available.
(E)  On-the-job training.
(F)  Job search and job readiness assistance.
(G)  Vocational educational training not to exceed 12 months with respect to any individual.
(H)  Job skills training directly related to employment.
(I)  Education directly related to employment, in the case of a recipient who has not received a high school diploma or a certificate of high school equivalency.
(J)  Satisfactory attendance at secondary school or in a course of study leading to a certificate of general equivalence, in the case of a recipient who has not completed secondary school or received such a certificate.

House Majority Leader Responds to Governor’s Veto of HB1637

CONCORD – Today House Majority Leader Rep. Richard Hinch (R-Merrimack) released the following statement in response to the governor’s veto of HB1637, relative to school attendance in towns with no public schools. HB1637 committee of conference report passed the House 190-132.

“I am deeply disappointed that the governor is once again playing politics and vetoed this important legislation that would have given local control to towns and parents,” said Rep. Hinch. “There are many small towns in New Hampshire, like Croydon, that don’t have their own school systems, and parents should have the choice of where they believe their child fits best and can thrive.”

“Maybe if the governor remained in the state to do her job, she would see how signing this bill would have helped our small towns rather than obstructing them. This continued absence from her commitments and responsibilities amounts to having a part-time governor. The people of New Hampshire deserve better.”